Your Support Helps First Responders

When you give to the V Foundation, we ensure your dollars go toward meaningful research that has the potential to impact and save people.

A recent study funded by the V Foundation researched the connection between the environmental exposures at the World Trade Center site and first responders from 9/11 diagnosed with a type of bone marrow cancer called multiple myeloma. The funding for this study was first announced in 2013.

Thanks to your donations, the identification of firefighters with multiple myeloma is leading to early intervention efforts that are being initiated now. Your support continues to save lives and fuel progress in cancer research. Thank you!

The terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) on 9/11/2001 in New York City created exposure to cancer-causing chemicals. These chemicals were produced by collapsed and burning buildings and by the diesel smoke from heavy equipment used during the 10-month rescue and recovery efforts.

Your support funded a study conducted at the Bureau of Health Services at the Fire Department of the City of New York. They hypothesized the WTC first responders had an increased risk of a multiple myeloma diagnosis. The project was looking to:

  1. Determine the characteristics of a WTC firefighter diagnosed with multiple myeloma.
  2. Conduct tests to discover if they can diagnose future cases more quickly.

The study concluded that WTC firefighters with multiple myeloma were being diagnosed on average at age 57, much younger than other adults in the US being diagnosed. In addition, they found that those who were diagnosed had a specific cell (MGUS) in their blood that can be detected prior to being diagnosed with this cancer. This means that doctors can take blood samples from WTC firefighters to screen for MGUS and to diagnose and treat multiple myeloma sooner.

Thanks to your donations, the identification of firefighters with multiple myeloma is leading to early intervention efforts tht are being initaited now. Your support continues to save lives and fuel progress in cancer research. Thank you!