Colby Thaxton, MD, PhD

The cells in the human body are constantly subjected to stress, which is linked to changes in cellular metabolism. Our research team, and others, have made connections between these cell conditions and cancer. Our central question is: Can we make a simple blood test that provides an accurate measure of ongoing cell stress and metabolic changes to gauge an individual’s risk of cancer? This test may provide more than just a snapshot measure of cancer risk. For example, the test could be used to measure how lifestyle changes modify cancer risk across the lifespan. To answer our question, we developed expertise that enables rapid measurement of signals in certain blood cells attributed to changes in cell stress and metabolism. Our study will determine if these signals can be used to quantify cancer risk. We will obtain blood samples from individuals without cancer, from individuals who have a condition known to increase their risk of cancer, and from individuals diagnosed with cancer. We will isolate certain cells from these samples and then measure the candidate signals in the cells. We anticipate our studies to reveal that the signals we are measuring will be the lowest in healthy individuals, will increase in individuals with the precancer condition, and will be highest in people diagnosed with cancer. These findings would powerfully validate our technology and suggest that individuals may benefit from our test for the early detection, and even prevention, of cancer.

Location: Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center - NC
Proposal: Liquid Biopsy to Measure Novel Biomarker of ImmunoMetabolic Cancer Risk (IMCR)
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