Lecia Sequist, MD

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both the US and the world. There is an effective screening tool called low dose computed tomography (CT) scans of the lungs, which can find lung cancers earlier while curative surgery is still an option. These screening CT scans are recommended once to year for heavy current and former smokers, but only a tiny fraction of those who should be getting lung screening are receiving it, in part because of the high false positive rate with screening CT scans. When lung screening identifies an abnormal area (called a nodule) within the lung, the chances are much greater that it will turn out to be benign rather than cancer. However, to prove the nodule is benign a battery of tests and procedures are often ordered, leading to cost, inconvenience, possible complications, and worry. Our project aims to cut the obstacle of false positive results on lung cancer screening in half by developing a blood test that can be drawn in a doctor’s office after a patient is found to have a lung nodule on a screening CT scan and can help predict whether the nodule is benign or cancerous. The test is built upon a cutting-edge technology called multiplexed mass spectrometry-based plasma proteomics, which can detect the signature spectrum of hundreds of proteins within a patient’s blood plasma using just a small sample. Our test will look at the pattern of proteins to see if the pattern matches those seen in cancer patients. Our long-term goal is to develop an accessible test that will promote increased lung cancer screening uptake and lead to more lives saved.

Location: Massachusetts General Hospital - NC
Proposal: Early lung cancer detection through unbiased high throughout deep plasma proteomics
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